by Ajahn Chah, Thanissaro Bhikkhu 2013 English

Introduction

Venerable Ajahn Chah was a master at using the apt and unusual simile to explain points of Dhamma in a memorable way, sometimes to answer questions, sometimes to provoke them. He was especially talented at exploiting the open-ended nature of the simile—in which some similarities are relevant and others are not—using a particular image to make one point in one context, and a very different point in another.
This book is a companion to In Simple Terms, an earlier collection of similes drawn from Ajahn Chah’s transcribed talks. Here, the majority of the passages come from a compilation made by Ajahn Jandee Kantasaro, one of Ajahn Chah’s students, entitled Khwaam Phid Nai Khwaam Thuuk (What’s Wrong in What’s Right). The title of this compilation is taken from a phrase that Ajahn Chah often used to describe the misuse of correct knowledge. Ajahn Jandee, in his introduction, illustrates the principle by telling of a man he once encountered who used the teaching on inconstancy to justify the fact that he never cleaned his truck.
Khwaam Phid Nai Khwaam Thuuk contains 186 short passages transcribed directly from recordings of Ajahn Chah’s talks and conversations. From these passages[…]

Excerpt From: Venerable Ajahn Chah. “It’s Like This: 108 Dhamma Similes.”